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There are a number of programs that never seem to be installed with the base system, but should be. In this day and age of click-to-install, these programs will often require an additional install – I maintain that this should not be.

Most of these will be relevant to Linux, but the programs will often be missing on other commercial UNIXes also.

  • Ruby. This is the first that comes to mind. I have been installing ruby onto systems since 1.46 – and ruby is still a fantastic scripting language, and one of the best implementations of object-orientated programming since Smalltalk.
  • m4. I recently wrote about m4, and thought it was already installed on my Ubuntu Karmic system – not so. I used it to create a template for the APT sources.list file.
  • ssh. This should be installed everywhere automatically, and not as an add-on. For many UNIX systems, ssh is an add-on product that must be selected or compiled from source.
  • rsync. Rsync is a fabulous way to copy files across the network while minimizing traffic – even though it is not designed to be a fast way.
  • ksh. This will surprise most commercial UNIX administrators. However, Linux does not come with ksh installed – and the emulation by GNU bash is weak. Now you can install either AT&T ksh-93 (the newest version!) or the old standby, pdksh (which is close to ksh-88).

OpenVMS is a different animal – and some of the things that should be installed by default would be perl, ruby, java, SMH, and ssh. I’m not sure if perl or ssh is installed by default, but they should be. OpenVMS should also support compliant NFS v3 and v4 support out of the box – without making it difficult to connect to other NFS servers.

What programs do you think should be in the base install?

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